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College completion rates vary widely along racial and ethnic lines, with black and Hispanic students earning credentials at a much lower rate than white and Asian students do, according to a report released Wednesday by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.The center evaluated data from students nationwide who entered a college or university in fall 2010.But if you wait until age 32 (just 10 years later), you'll have to save ,200 per year to reach that same goal of

College completion rates vary widely along racial and ethnic lines, with black and Hispanic students earning credentials at a much lower rate than white and Asian students do, according to a report released Wednesday by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.The center evaluated data from students nationwide who entered a college or university in fall 2010.But if you wait until age 32 (just 10 years later), you'll have to save $8,200 per year to reach that same goal of $1 million at age 62.​Here's how much you would have to save each year, based on your age, to reach $1 million at 62. Just waiting from when you're 22 to 29, it costs you $2,800 more per year, assuming the same rate of return, to achieve the same goal.That's why it's essential to start investing early, and there is no better time than after graduation.After releasing those results for the first time this year, the National Student Clearinghouse plans to release updated data annually, Shapiro said.Each institution will also be able to see its own data and compare to national trends.Rather, what this age group really needs is financial education.

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College completion rates vary widely along racial and ethnic lines, with black and Hispanic students earning credentials at a much lower rate than white and Asian students do, according to a report released Wednesday by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

The center evaluated data from students nationwide who entered a college or university in fall 2010.

But if you wait until age 32 (just 10 years later), you'll have to save $8,200 per year to reach that same goal of $1 million at age 62.​Here's how much you would have to save each year, based on your age, to reach $1 million at 62. Just waiting from when you're 22 to 29, it costs you $2,800 more per year, assuming the same rate of return, to achieve the same goal.

That's why it's essential to start investing early, and there is no better time than after graduation.

million at age 62.​Here's how much you would have to save each year, based on your age, to reach

College completion rates vary widely along racial and ethnic lines, with black and Hispanic students earning credentials at a much lower rate than white and Asian students do, according to a report released Wednesday by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.The center evaluated data from students nationwide who entered a college or university in fall 2010.But if you wait until age 32 (just 10 years later), you'll have to save $8,200 per year to reach that same goal of $1 million at age 62.​Here's how much you would have to save each year, based on your age, to reach $1 million at 62. Just waiting from when you're 22 to 29, it costs you $2,800 more per year, assuming the same rate of return, to achieve the same goal.That's why it's essential to start investing early, and there is no better time than after graduation.After releasing those results for the first time this year, the National Student Clearinghouse plans to release updated data annually, Shapiro said.Each institution will also be able to see its own data and compare to national trends.Rather, what this age group really needs is financial education.

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College completion rates vary widely along racial and ethnic lines, with black and Hispanic students earning credentials at a much lower rate than white and Asian students do, according to a report released Wednesday by the National Student Clearinghouse Research Center.

The center evaluated data from students nationwide who entered a college or university in fall 2010.

But if you wait until age 32 (just 10 years later), you'll have to save $8,200 per year to reach that same goal of $1 million at age 62.​Here's how much you would have to save each year, based on your age, to reach $1 million at 62. Just waiting from when you're 22 to 29, it costs you $2,800 more per year, assuming the same rate of return, to achieve the same goal.

That's why it's essential to start investing early, and there is no better time than after graduation.

million at 62. Just waiting from when you're 22 to 29, it costs you ,800 more per year, assuming the same rate of return, to achieve the same goal.That's why it's essential to start investing early, and there is no better time than after graduation.After releasing those results for the first time this year, the National Student Clearinghouse plans to release updated data annually, Shapiro said.Each institution will also be able to see its own data and compare to national trends.Rather, what this age group really needs is financial education.

“Community colleges have long been held out as engines of access to higher education,” Shapiro said, making these “disappointing results -- the rate at which students from underrepresented groups managed to complete that transfer from community college to a bachelor degree.” For years, colleges and universities had been asking for racial and ethnic breakdowns of completion rates.We may receive compensation when you click on links to those products. There are so many options, tools, thoughts, blogs to read about, and more. I'm going to share my thoughts on what you should do to start investing after college in your twenties when you're 22-29 years old. Be sure to check out the other articles in this series:​According to a Gallup Poll, the average age investors started saving is 29 years old.For an explanation of our Advertising Policy, visit this page. And only 26% of people start investing before the age of 25.So, if you're thinking of getting started investing, do you need a financial advisor? But a lot of people get hung up on this need for "professional" advice.Here are some thoughts on this subject from a few financial experts (and the overwhelming answer is NO):​I don't believe that young investors need a financial advisor.

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