Jewish and catholic dating

The question was regarding what would be necessary for her to marry a Catholic in the Catholic Church, not what is necessary for her to be considered divorced within Judaism.

To marry a Catholic, the prior bond would need to be examined through the Tribunal process.

The grounds for a decree of nullity are the same for everyone.

The woman should discuss her situation with the priest or deacon, or representative of the tribunal. These types of questions cannot be answered here-- the specific evidence of the case must be presented to the tribunal to investigate.

As I said in the previous post: Drunkness at the time the vows are exchanged may be grounds that nullify the consent. If, after investigation, it is determined that there was an impediment– such as drunkenness at the wedding on the part of the bride or groom or both-- then yes, the Tribunal would find that consent was impaired.

As I said in the previous post: Drunkness at the time the vows are exchanged may be grounds that nullify the consent. A Jewish orthodox wedding is valid both from a Jewish religious point of you and is also recognized as a marriage from a civil point of view.

The impairment of being drunk is not related to who performs the marriage (JP). There could have been an impediment of some kind in this case too. For a decree of nullity, there would have to be proof of a canonical impediment. As I stated previously, they would have to demonstrate that an impediment existed at the time the vows were exchanged. The fact that the Chruch recognizes valid marriages as permanent and indissoluable is “horse hockey”?

Drunkness at the time the vows are exchanged may be grounds that nullify the consent. The woman could present such proof, if it exists, to the Tribunal to consider. The Church takes seriously it’s responsibility to uphold valid marriages and help those who are in an invalid marriage.

The impairment of being drunk is not related to who performs the marriage (JP). As I stated previously, they would have to demonstrate that an impediment existed at the time the vows were exchanged. By the same token, two non-baptized persons (or one baptized non-Catholic and one unbaptized person) who contract a religious or civil marriage have a good and natural marriage and it is a valid marriage.If the woman has converted to Catholicism, then she may be able to go through a different process that the Church has regarding an unbaptized person who becomes baptized and wishes to marry in the faith.The good and natural marriage can be dissolved in favor of the faith.If you want more information and explanation of all the various grounds for nullity, I suggest you get the book Annulment: The Wedding That Was by Michael Smith Foster.From what I understand about annulments, some are easier to get than others.

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